Paris Fashion Week Men's: Our favourites for SS 20

Paris Fashion Week Men’s has now ended and here are our favourite shows and designers for spring/summer 2020:

DIOR

Classic and classy with modern aesthetic and the new tailoring on its best.

JW ANDERSON

Elements and styling from the Middle East with a JW Anderson twist.

JACQUEMUS

The French designer celebated the 10th anniversary fo his brand and the show was definitely one of our favourites. The collection was colourful and sexy all the way.

Dries Van Noten

Floral and animal prints with strong army elements and extreme styling.

BALMAIN

Olivier Rousteing is finally back showcasing a refined, colourful collection. We loved the strong tailoring elements.

Balenciaga AW 2019-2020 at Paris Fashion Week

Demna did it again, as he managed to present us another fresh view of the ‘New’ Balenciaga era.

Showcasing more than 100 looks in total and with menswear being a very strong presence on the catwalk, he managed to deliver what his fans and the fashion world was expecting to see at Paris Fashion Week.

Noteable 90s elements, extra-wide shoulders, bold colours, clean lines and the ‘Demna’ tailoring on its best; here are some of our favourite menswear looks at Balenciaga Ready to Wear Collection.

photography: vogue.com

Isabel Marant Men: All the new silhouettes for AW 2019-2020

Isabel Marant delivers an autumn-winter 2019-2020 collection inspired by urban safari through a sandy-white, off-white, khaki-colored range of ultra comfortable models such as knit sweaters, carrot pants and 80's shoulder suits. Cocooning silhouettes that will, for sure, embellish the men's wardrobe next winter.

source: vogue hommes

Maison Margiela: AW19 men's collection

Maison Margiela AW19 offered up an antidote to digital overload.

John Galliano presented the latest collection for his band of ‘digital nomads’ and we love every single piece of it.

The show was on the tittles of every fashion site and magazine and here are the key elements of the Maison Margiela AW19 by John Galliano.

  • It was darker than the previous collection but the blalck gave space to the most colourful (neon) pieces to shine.

  • Painted hair, make up on men’s eyes, feathers and elements from the ‘Swan Lake’

  • Extra wide shoulders wih triangle shapes on the outerwear and belts as the main accessories completed the styling.

Celine Men AW19 at Paris Fashion Week

n his debut show for Celine – now sans accent – in September, Hedi Slimane made it more than clear what his intentions are for the house. If anyone thought that some of the reactions to that show would have an effect on his vision, his first men’s show for Celine spelled out a big fat – or indeed very, very skinny – no. In fashion, as in life, there are certain forces that will make themselves heard. Slimane is one of them. He believes in his own vision to its utmost core: from the mechanical light installation that fanfares every show (this time it was a huge geometric ball) to the stick thin models that walk his runway (a new one turns 18 every minute), to the emerging rock bands that score his collections (the irreverently named Crack Cloud), and the vintage-inspired aesthetic that embodies his garments. No matter how deep you search, the ultimate proposal of any of his collections – and indeed the one he showed on Sunday night – is in essence the brand of Hedi Slimane.

Seasonal collections, however, are put in the world to propose something new for the immediate future. So how do you, as an observer of such collections, approach the work of a designer, who believes so strongly in a consistent point of view? You could read into Sunday evening’s Celine collection and say that it proposed a more cropped and roomier tailored trouser, or that its suiting evoked the tie-wearing Patrick Bateman yuppie dad tailoring of 1980s’ Valentino; only cut for a much, much skinnier frame. You could talk about the glitter and sequinned pieces, which were no doubt of a notable artisanal value. Or you could point out the obvious nostalgia – or was it wistfulness – that existed within the collection for the mid-2000s when indie music culture was at its high and everyone looked like the boys, who walked the 2019 Celine runway. What has to be stated – for the sake of the history books – is that Celine menswear, which didn’t exist under Slimane’s predecessor Phoebe Philo, was brought into the world looking like this.

find more on vogue.co.uk

Dior Men AW19 at Paris Fashion Week Men's

Kim Jones did it again… and we loved every single look of this new DIOR Men collection for autumn/winter 2019 -2020.

He offered a remarkably refined vision of modern masculinity and here are some higlights to note before you check out the new collection:

  • After the enormous floral effigy of Monsieur Dior created by KAWS and the 39-foot tall Hajime Sorayama robot, this season he staged the show On A Conveyor Belt.

  • The Clothes Offered A Modern Vision Of Elegance.

  • The animal print will be the new men’s essential.

  • Raymond Pettibon Offered Up Punk Couture

“This time I wanted the clothes to be the statues,” said Kim Jones

source: vogue.co.uk

Kris van Assche’s debut at Berluti during Paris Fashion Week.

It’s been 10 months since Kris Van Assche was appointed creative director of Berluti, departing the storied couturier Dior and setting up shop within a brand long-established not for its garments but, first and foremost, its “exquisite leather” and its handmade shoes. “Luxury takes time. I needed these months to understand Berluti and turn the page,” he reflected backstage. “It’s a totally different know-how: I come from a luxury house, but this is a different kind of luxury.”


Kris van Assche’s TRENDS proposals:

  • Scarlet - Hot Pink combination

  • Patinated leather on clothing ( even on suits)

  • Overcoats will always be … grey

  • Slim and skinny are the new lines on trousers.

  • Ponyskin is the next new thing on jackets and accessories.

Dries Van Noten AW19 at Paris Fashion Week Men's

Dries Van Noten has presented a selection of voices that accompanied his AW 2019/2020 collection—an aural backdrop of snatches of conversations and interviews with the men Van Noten admires. There was David Bowie, of course: his pleated pants, a flavor of his ’80s persona. There was David Hockney, talking about getting up mid-morning in California, and going out to see what’s around to paint.

There was a burst of Jimi Hendrix—cue a riff on tie-dye. Kurt Cobain, Andy Warhol, Francis Bacon, Yves Saint Laurent, David Byrne. And in the middle of it, there was the mordant voice of an Englishman, nailing the state of affairs today. “I think the whole of our society is run by insane people for insane objects," he said. Turned out to be John Lennon, in the ’60s.

source: vogue.com